Are the particles stardust or comet dust?

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DustTrailFinder

Post by DustTrailFinder »

There were two separate trays of aerogel, one for collecting cometary particles and one for collecting interstellar particles. I don't know what medium separated them, but they were in separate trays on opposite sides of the same platform and of equal surface size. Although the collector for both was deployed to collect particles at the same time, only one was open at specially selected times and aimed at collecting the data it was designed to collect. Thus, when interstellar matter for this project was collected, the interstellar portion of the collector was deployed and opened toward the the best known source for those particles while the other cometary side was away from and closed to the collection of particles. When cometary particles from Wild 2 were available, the collector was deployed with the cometary aerogel side open and exposed toward that source, while the interstellar side was closed and opposite. I don't know how it could be stated more clearly than this. If in doubt, you should see Dr. Tsou's video at NASA's website.

fjgiie
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Post by fjgiie »

DustTrailFinder
This sure sounds better to me, your version of tray deployment.

Also I believe that the stardust grains did not arrive from the direction the vehicle was traveling, but from the side and under their own speed and momentum. Right?
So, they could hit the collector at an angle... other than 90 degrees?

Siegfried
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Post by Siegfried »

You know, this mission ought to have Gershwin's Second Rhapsody as its theme song. :mrgreen:
And God said: E = +mv^2 - Ze^2/r ...and there *WAS* light!

WANTED:
Dead or Alive
^-^
( ^ )
Schroedinger's Cat

DustTrailFinder

Post by DustTrailFinder »

fjgiie wrote:DustTrailFinder
This sure sounds better to me, your version of tray deployment.

Also I believe that the stardust grains did not arrive from the direction the vehicle was traveling, but from the side and under their own speed and momentum. Right?
So, they could hit the collector at an angle... other than 90 degrees?
I don't think this is just my "version," but the actual version from the available information I've looked at.

As to what angle particles might have entered the collector, I would think that the greater number would enter very close to 90 degrees. It looks like the interstellar entry of these particles come from a relatively parallel course, and that the collector was aimed to capture them as head on as possible. From the information available, I believe that any particles that might have entered at a rather oblique angle might be suspect as to origin, while the particles entering closer to perpendicular are more likely to be interstellar.

Siegfried
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Post by Siegfried »

Now, I heard mention of an "Interstellar Dust Stream" somewhere on this site (capitalized for artisitc effect). Now, what exactly is the course it takes? Not EXACTLY, but from what direction does it come? Or is it not kept fine by the slingshot effect of other stars, but a broad diffuse moving cloud coming from a certain direction?
And God said: E = +mv^2 - Ze^2/r ...and there *WAS* light!

WANTED:
Dead or Alive
^-^
( ^ )
Schroedinger's Cat

DustTrailFinder

Post by DustTrailFinder »

Siegfried wrote:Now, I heard mention of an "Interstellar Dust Stream" somewhere on this site (capitalized for artisitc effect). Now, what exactly is the course it takes? Not EXACTLY, but from what direction does it come? Or is it not kept fine by the slingshot effect of other stars, but a broad diffuse moving cloud coming from a certain direction?
The interstellar dust direction was detected on prior missions. If you want to get an idea of its direction, I would suggest you look at the timelines shown for this mission, its orbits, and when the collectors were opened to collect data.

I don't know why the interstellar dust comes from a relatively parallel direction into our solar system, nor have I seen an explanation from the scientists. It could be that the timing from a nova or supernova explosion makes those particles available and/or the solar system deflects and/or absorbs particles from other directions. If the scientists/moderators know the answer, then it would be of interest to all of us to hear their expert explanation.

fjgiie
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Post by fjgiie »

Dr. Bryan Mendez will be back here Thursday, June 1st. Maybe he will answer as to where, and from what direction these stardust particles come from. I'll E-Mail Bryan if he does not volunteer an answer. (if it's OK with him) Ha, ha

http://cse.ssl.berkeley.edu/bmendez/html/cv.html

Verenique
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Post by Verenique »

DustTrailFinder wrote:From the information available, I believe that any particles that might have entered at a rather oblique angle might be suspect as to origin, while the particles entering closer to perpendicular are more likely to be interstellar.
Hmmmm.... Makes me wonder... That means that the cone-shaped trajectory of an IS particle inside the aerogel should have a more circular rather than elipsoid cross-sectional perimeter in those slices of the medium we will be scanning in our VMs. That is , of course if the slices of aerogel are cut in a plane parallel to its surface.

Could that be one of the features to look for?
Carbon number 7 inside my limbic's particular receptor, originated from a purple Supernova, generating illusions of explosions at a glance of your figure.

fjgiie
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Angle of strike

Post by fjgiie »

Anna Butterworth said:
As to what we are expecting for the real dust tracks: the interstellar dust stream entering our solar system comes from one direction, but we don't know in advance what the exact spread of incident angles will be. Tracks made by interplanetary dust particles in the collector can come from any direction.

jonlboy
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What are the particles?

Post by jonlboy »

We are doing the basic research into what the particles are, population and "possible" sources. We have 4 primary sources: stellar, planetary/asteroidal, cometary and interstellar. We CANNOT discern the source for all of the particles until we have enough data to make an intellegent guess.

Until there is enough data to statistically form a consesus, all we have is particle type and relative velocity; anything else is speculation.[/code]

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