Trivia!

This forum is for discussing space science topics related to Stardust@home.

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Ferrum
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Post by Ferrum »

So you both agree that a star may have dimmed in the recent past...the real question is which one and what caused the fluctuation in brightness? THE VM IS UP AND RUNNING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Man am I pumped!
The integral sec y dy
From zero to one-sixth of pi
Is the log to base e
Of the square root of three.
Um...times the square root of the fourth power of i.

DustBuster
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Post by DustBuster »

I've found no less than three different stories as to which star has dimmed. If the dimming is not due to one of the causes I mentioned earlier, then I am all out of guess- I do have 10 questions ready, though!
No dessert for you- ONE MONTH!

Ferrum
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Post by Ferrum »

Go right ahead DustBuster...not only were you the first person to respond, you came the closest to what I was looking for in your answer. The best explanation I have heard thus far is that one of the Pleiads -- Pleione -- spins well over 100 times faster than the sun, and as a result 'shells' of gas surround the star, which in turn cause fairly large brightness fluctuations. Unfortunately, not much info is available online which would allow one to connect this to the "lost pleiad."
The integral sec y dy
From zero to one-sixth of pi
Is the log to base e
Of the square root of three.
Um...times the square root of the fourth power of i.

DustBuster
DustMod
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Joined: Wed May 17, 2006 8:12 pm
Location: Horsetown, USA

Post by DustBuster »

Interesting. You've piqued my curiousity. I couldn't find anything that gave me that information, but I'll keep my eyes open.
No dessert for you- ONE MONTH!

DustBuster
DustMod
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Joined: Wed May 17, 2006 8:12 pm
Location: Horsetown, USA

Post by DustBuster »

These will probably hang around for a while since the project is up and running. Enjoy!

1. Locate and identify this planetary “crack” that is nearly 4000 kilometers long, spans as much as 600 kilometers across, and is up to 10 kilometers deep. Image

2. Though the same side always faces the Earth, we can actually see 59% of the Moon. What do we call the effect that makes this possible?

3. Name this series of satellites launched in the 1990’s known to produce “flares” so bright they are regularly visible to the unaided eye, even in broad daylight?

4. In about 100,000 million years, what will become of the Mars moon ‘Phobos’?

5. What was the name of the spacecraft that gave humans the first views of the averted side of the Moon?

6. How long does it take the Sun to travel once around the galactic center?

7. The first group of shuttle-era astronauts (1978) called themselves the TFNG’s; what do these letters stand for? (hint: if your answer contains obscenities, it’s incorrect!)

8. Near M30, this constellation introduced in the 17th century depicts what StarDust related item?

9. Explain why astronauts can’t belch (while in space).

10. Where does this equation originate and what does it represent?
((12 + 144 + 20 + (3 * 4^(1/2))) / 7) + (5 * 11) = 9^2 + 0
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btwong10
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Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:17 pm

Post by btwong10 »

Answers:

1 - Valles Marineris: The Grand Canyon of Mars

2 - because of librations, we can see up to 59% of the Moon's surface.

3 - The Iridium satellite constellation, composed of 66 satellites

4 - it will crash into Mars or disintegrate (?spelling) into a ring around Mars

5 – Luna 3

6 - 250 million years

7 – Thirty-Five New Guys

8 – :?:

9 - Astronauts cannot burp in space. There is no gravity to separate liquid from gas in their stomachs.

10- :?:

DustBuster
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Post by DustBuster »

Way to go, btwong10!

I would have thought #8 and #10 to be easier than #7.

Anyone else want to have a go at those 2?

*edit* And #7 goes with a big "Thanks" to R. Mike Mullane!
No dessert for you- ONE MONTH!

Ferrum
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Post by Ferrum »

An efficient synopsis of Pleione's fluctuations can be found at

http://www.astro.uiuc.edu/~kaler/sow/pleione.html

One of my old profs had us write a short paper on Gamma Cassiopeiae variables, and as a result I found this (very obscure) bit of trivia. Thanks for playing! So we're doing limericks now, eh DustBuster? :wink:
The integral sec y dy
From zero to one-sixth of pi
Is the log to base e
Of the square root of three.
Um...times the square root of the fourth power of i.

DustBuster
DustMod
Posts: 694
Joined: Wed May 17, 2006 8:12 pm
Location: Horsetown, USA

Post by DustBuster »

Ferrum-
Thanks for the link (and the additional limerick!) I'll check it out.
No dessert for you- ONE MONTH!

KarMann
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Location: Milwaukee, WI, USA
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Post by KarMann »

#8: Microscopium, the Microscope

Also, going back a bit, I'd like to point out:
TimStrange wrote:1. What was the last Apollo mission flown, and in what year?

Apollo 17
Launched 07 December 1972
Landed on Moon 11 December 1972
Taurus-Littrow
Returned to Earth 19 December 1972
http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/planetary/lunar/apollo.html
Apollo-Soyuz, July 15-24, 1975 - nobody specified lunar Apollo mission, and there was Skylab in between, too.
Aquila Hawk wrote:9. Hey, Tim, if I'm right, we have the same favorite star. Alpha Aquilae, beter known by it's arabic name Altair. (the forbidden planet is Altair IV)
Add me to the list. I'm barely even sure why, I was so young when I decided that it was my favourite. Might be because of the constellation Aquila, though. I didn't know that about Forbidden Planet, though.
Let it never be said that your **** retentive attention to detail never yielded positive results. - Loki, Dogma

btwong10
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Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 11:17 pm

Post by btwong10 »

so whats the answer to number 10?

DustBuster
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Post by DustBuster »

btwong10 wrote:so whats the answer to number 10?
This arithmatic poem (limerick) was written by John Saxon, an author of math textbooks. (the answer can be found with a Google "I'm feeling lucky" search for the equation):

((12 + 144 + 20 + (3 * 4^(1/2))) / 7) + (5 * 11) = 9^2 + 0

A Dozen, a Gross and a Score,
plus three times the square root of four,
divided by seven,
plus five times eleven,
equals nine squared and not a bit more.

Alright btwong10, you answered the bulk of the questions; and so to you falls the honor of creating another 10 questions to keep this, "the happiest little StarDust topic", rolling along. You may alternately decline and put the task up for grabs.

Good focus bars to everyone!
No dessert for you- ONE MONTH!

May2904
Posts: 14
Joined: Wed Jun 21, 2006 9:53 am
Location: Lincoln, NE

Post by May2904 »

So btwong10 are you going to give us the next set of 10 or can someone else do the honors?

DustBuster
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Post by DustBuster »

Ok, May. If you've got 10, let's get the ball rolling!
No dessert for you- ONE MONTH!

May2904
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Joined: Wed Jun 21, 2006 9:53 am
Location: Lincoln, NE

Post by May2904 »

Allright - here goes!!!

1. How fast is the moon moving away from the sun?
2. What is the surface temperature of the Sun?
3. What is Quintuplet?
4. What was discovered in Quintuplet that ended a long-standing debate?
5. What is the value of the Hubble constant?
6. Why is Q6's value so important?
7. Dark spots are appearing and disappearing each "year" on what
planet?
8. What do those dark spots reveal about the planet?
9. What milestone did Voyager 1 reach on August 15th?
10. What is the area that Voyager 1 is in called and what is known about
it?

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