Trivia!

This forum is for discussing space science topics related to Stardust@home.

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Sharqua
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Post by Sharqua »

Awww... how sweet!

Thanks! :D

I'm enjoying my vacation. We'll be going camping starting Tuesday, but right now I have Internet access.

-Shar

fjgiie
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Happy Independence Day

Post by fjgiie »

Happy Independence Day to the United States. Here is a short excerpt from a book written in 1887 about my great, great, great grandfather who fought in the revolution around 1776. I know our British friends love to get me back by continuing to call the US " the colonies".

"The branch of the family to which I belong have been noted for their great physical strength. Family tradition says that my great grandfather Israel Gray was once captured during the War of the Revolution and was in the charge of seven (7) men at night. By watching his chance he (having succeeded in getting his hands loose, for they had bound him to a tree) being a very powerful man, sprang upon the sentinel and disarmed and killed him without arousing the others, and then by using the bayonet before the others awoke, and the club of the musket, and shooting after they awoke, he succeeded in slaying them all. When he returned to camp and told how he had escaped and that he had killed seven of the British, his companions would not believe him until he took them to the place and showed them the seven dead bodies."
Gray Genealogy by Marcius Dennison Raymond

Ferrum
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Post by Ferrum »

This was always a fun thread...let's see if we can get it going again in time for the big day.

1. Alpha Aquilae is known as Altair, so what are Beta Aquilae and Gamma Aquilae also known as?
Answer: Alshain and Tarazed respectively.

2. What is a parsec and how is it determined?
Answer: A parsec is the distance from our Sun that would cause a parallax of 1 arc-second as seen from our planet Earth, and the word "parsec" is actually an abbreviation of the phrase "parallax second” which evolved into my old AIM screenname. Put in abbreviated terms (I sadly had to check my textbook from 2 years ago as I’m no longer an astrophysics major): 1 pc = 1AU/tan 1” = 1.496 x 10^11 m/ tan [2∏/(60)(60)(360)] = 3.086 x 10^16 m

3. What class of star is our sun?
Answer: Our sun is a yellow orange, main sequence dwarf star, with a spectral class of G2V.

4. What was the ice dwarf that is a quarter the size of Pluto named and what was it named in honor of?
Answer: Quite a few trans-neptunian objects are thought to be around a quarter the size of Pluto (either in terms of diameter or volume), and it's tough to pin down the size of many, so I’ll take a few guesses…Varuna (A Vedic god of the sky, of rain, of law and of the underworld), Huya (the rain god of the Wayuu Indians of northern Venezuela and Colombia), Sedna (the Inuit creation deity) or Quaoar (a Native American creation deity).

5. What is the name of the Japanese probe to collect asteroid matter and retern it to Earth?
Answer: Hayabusa.

6. What does the probe's name in question #5 mean in english?
Answer: Falcon.

7. What two constellations are associated with Sagitarrius and may have been the source of one of the twelve trials of Hercules? Also, name the trial.
Answer: The constellation Sagittarius represents a centaur or an archer, or most often a combination of both, and contains my favorite asterism, the Teapot. If one attempts to draw Sagittarius in the night sky, it may also spill over into neighboring constellations, including Microscopium. Hercules’ sixth labor (associated with Sagittarius) was to kill the Stymphalian birds, represented by Aquila, Cygnus, and Lyra, the last of which was originally visualized as a vulture.

8. The Earth is theorized to be about 4.6 billion years old, however the oldest rocks on Earth are much younger. What was used instead of Earth rocks to determine this age and what specific type is it?
Answer: The oldest rocks on Earth were found in northwestern Canada, and were found to be just a shade over 4 billion years old. In Australia, zircon crystals have been found that have radiometric ages approaching 4.3 billion years. The oldest dated moon rocks are between 4.4 and 4.5 billion years old and provide a base age for the formation of the moon. The age of the Earth (4.55 Ga) was established 50 years ago using Uranium-Lead dating on meteorite fragments. The metorite in question is an iron octahedrite named the Canyon Diablo meteorite.

9. Name the three types of planets in the solar system and their characteristics.
Answer: Small, rocky inner planets (aka the terrestrial planets); giant, gas outer planets (aka jovian planets); and "ice dwarfs," bodies (such as Pluto) with solid surfaces but largely comprised of icy material, unlike the terrestrial planets.

10. What is a "Tatooine Planet" and what charactaristic in it's star system makes them different from other planets we know of?
Answer: The planet in question exists in a triple star system, which was thought impossible until fairly recently (I think most fellow star wars fans could have guessed this correctly without a second thought :wink: ).
The integral sec y dy
From zero to one-sixth of pi
Is the log to base e
Of the square root of three.
Um...times the square root of the fourth power of i.

Aquila Hawk
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Post by Aquila Hawk »

Sweet! Someone answered the questions! :D Few things though, I would have accepted chondrites (rocky meteorites) for #8 and I have actually seen and held one of the oldest dated sedimentary rock. But anyway, you were right on there. Your turn Ferrum
Everyone talks about SOH CAH TOA, but no one ever talks about CHO SHA CAO.

Ferrum
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Post by Ferrum »

1.) After 10’s of thousands of years, name an object in the constellation Cygnus that the Crab Nebula will likely begin to resemble.

2.) This vast 222km diameter crater on the Moon is located next to Riccioli.

3.) Name a constellation that has no stars brighter than 3rd magnitude.

4.) Approximately how close did the Stardust probe fly to comet Wild 2?

5.) If a telescope has a 220mm aperture, what is its theoretical limit of resolution in seconds of arc?

6.) Present a plausible explanation why the Greek poet Aratus wrote about this asterism: “…their number seven, though the myths oft say…that one has passed away.”

7.) Fred Whipple suggested what device in 1946 which was later used on the Stardust mission?

8.) When will the next total solar eclipse be visible from the continental USA?

9.) Why can’t we see where the big bang started?

10.) How much brighter (within 10%) would the moon be if it was covered in clouds similar to Venus?
The integral sec y dy
From zero to one-sixth of pi
Is the log to base e
Of the square root of three.
Um...times the square root of the fourth power of i.

DustBuster
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Location: Horsetown, USA

Post by DustBuster »

I guess I'll take a shot- hopefully I got most of them!

1.) After 10’s of thousands of years, name an object in the constellation Cygnus that the Crab Nebula will likely begin to resemble.
The Veil Nebula
2.) This vast 222km diameter crater on the Moon is located next to Riccioli.
Crator Grimaldi
3.) Name a constellation that has no stars brighter than 3rd magnitude.
Monoceros
4.) Approximately how close did the Stardust probe fly to comet Wild 2?
100,000 kilometers
5.) If a telescope has a 220mm aperture, what is its theoretical limit of resolution in seconds of arc?
0.53
6.) Present a plausible explanation why the Greek poet Aratus wrote about this asterism: “…their number seven, though the myths oft say…that one has passed away.
From the Poem “Phaenomena”, referring to the Pleiades star cluster. In the Greek world there are two stories: One is that the seventh star is that of Merope, the only sister that married a mortal instead of a god, impelling her to hide her face in shame. The other popular explanation is that the lost Pleiad is Electra, the mother of Dardanus, the founder of Troy. Inconsolable at the burning of that great city, and the suffering of her family, she veiled her face and fled the group, occasionally returning for a brief visit in the form of a comet.
7.) Fred Whipple suggested what device in 1946 which was later used on the Stardust mission?
A "meteor bumper" (aka Whipple Shield)
8.) When will the next total solar eclipse be visible from the continental USA?
Aug 21, 2017
9.) Why can’t we see where the big bang started?
The Universe is homogeneous and isotropic
10.) How much brighter (within 10%) would the moon be if it was covered in clouds similar to Venus?
70%
No dessert for you- ONE MONTH!

Ferrum
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Post by Ferrum »

You didn't get all of them DustBuster, but great job nonetheless! Your answers to 6 and 9 weren't quite what I was going for, but the questions weren't very clear, so I can't complain. However, your answers to 4 and 10 were incorrect. If anyone else wants to take a crack at those questions, go for it, but I really don't have any problem posting the answers, so that DustBuster can come up with another 10 to keep it fresh.
The integral sec y dy
From zero to one-sixth of pi
Is the log to base e
Of the square root of three.
Um...times the square root of the fourth power of i.

Trev_lite
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Location: California sometime but I'm usually on the Internet

Post by Trev_lite »

the bigbang can't be located to any location since it happend efectivly everywere at the same time since when it happend the universe was a point and a point has only one location for stuff to happen.

the stardust probe passes with in 240 kilometers

in the moon had a surface like venus it would be the same brightness or less since the venus atmoshere absorbles visable light for the green house efect also were would the extra light come from
Im just a crazy insane mad scientist autistic talkative computer savant programmer and king of the internet. AND IM NOT JOKING ABOUT THIS

ADD/ADHD Meds are now use for SETs along with Trimethylxanthine, the active ingredient in coffee

DustBuster
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Post by DustBuster »

Ferrum wrote:You didn't get all of them DustBuster... Your answers to 6 and 9 weren't quite what I was going for... However, your answers to 4 and 10 were incorrect.
I'm surprised that #5 was right! As for #10, I tried to 'Capt. Kirk vs. Kobayashi Maru' your question and figured with a 10% cusion on either side I would be as close as I could get; and I was at the end of the hour I spent looking for the answers. Same with #9- I figured that answer would include just about everything!
Hi Trev_lite! Thanks for the assist (although I might challenge you for King of the Internet) As I understand it, The Moon is basically dark and only looks bright because it's against a black background and reflects about 7% of the light that strikes it, whereas the clouds of Venus reflect about 70%- so I went with it!
No dessert for you- ONE MONTH!

Ferrum
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Post by Ferrum »

Trev, right on with the big bang (that was the question that originally got me interested in astrophysics by the way)! However, I can't accept your other answers. EDIT: My only problem with your answer to the stardust flyby distance was that you added "within" 240 km, and the article I had read stated just over 240 km. I was being nitpicky, since different articles could very easily state slightly different figures.

DustBuster, you had the correct approximate numbers for #10, just redo your math.

Want to try a tie-breaker? Let's try rephasing one of the questions: Why have civilizations around the world stated that the Pleiades are comprised of seven stars, when in fact only six are easily visible to the naked eye? Please present a scientific explaination for what we might term the "lost Pleiad."
The integral sec y dy
From zero to one-sixth of pi
Is the log to base e
Of the square root of three.
Um...times the square root of the fourth power of i.

DustBuster
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Joined: Wed May 17, 2006 8:12 pm
Location: Horsetown, USA

Post by DustBuster »

Ferrum wrote: Why have civilizations around the world stated that the Pleiades are comprised of seven stars, when in fact only six are easily visible to the naked eye? Please present a scientific explaination for what we might term the "lost Pleiad."
Scientifically, If there were a 'seventh' star that is no longer visible, the reasons could include:

The star has dimmed.
The star is a variable star (erractic).
Interstellar dust has thickened around one star from our point of view... hey- the answer is StarDust!!!
No dessert for you- ONE MONTH!

Aquila Hawk
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Post by Aquila Hawk »

If this wasn't a tie breaker, I would chime in right now with the answer. Dustbuster, Trev, good luck.
Everyone talks about SOH CAH TOA, but no one ever talks about CHO SHA CAO.

DustBuster
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Post by DustBuster »

Okay. I did find one reference to a theory of a supernova around 2500-3000 B.C. based on ancient writings- there is no physical evidence to support this, but it fits with Aratus' “…their number seven, though the myths oft say…that one has passed away."
No dessert for you- ONE MONTH!

Trev_lite
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Post by Trev_lite »

origonly the seventh star was visable to the human eye but it dimmed over time. (there are acualy a few hundred stars in the area 6-14 visable depending on conditions with the eye) the greeks noticed this most likly. another solution is that the greeks were fasinated by the number 7 and just made up a story and there just happend to be a seventh star

the area is in a nebula so light is refleraced so the stars fuse. the greeks also had a fasination with the numbers 6 and 7 (6 being a PURE number and 7 prime)
Im just a crazy insane mad scientist autistic talkative computer savant programmer and king of the internet. AND IM NOT JOKING ABOUT THIS

ADD/ADHD Meds are now use for SETs along with Trimethylxanthine, the active ingredient in coffee

May2904
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Post by May2904 »

Bummer!!! I was almost done with the test and it was shut down!!

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