Do you have a relevant professional backgound?

This forum is for discussing space science topics related to Stardust@home.

Moderator: DustMods

Are you (training as) a professional scientist in a field relevant to the Stardust mission?

Yes: exact science (physics, chemistry,...)
31
24%
Yes: applied science (engineering,...)
28
21%
Yes: other (please specify)
2
2%
No
64
49%
Not sure (yet)
6
5%
 
Total votes: 131

Gillian
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Jun 15, 2006 3:29 am
Location: Birmingham, UK

Post by Gillian »

Im currently studying for the BSc Physical Sciences degree (biased towards astrophysics, planetary sciences) with the OU. Ive also had some experience in web/graphic design and photography, all of which are hobbies :)

spk72
Posts: 14
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2006 8:29 am
Location: Spring Grove, IL
Contact:

Post by spk72 »

I do failure analysis on medical equipment & spend a fair amount of time looking at PCB's with a microscope. Mostly though I'm an armchair scientist.
Well done is better than well said.
Benjamin Franklin

autoglitch
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Jun 15, 2006 2:25 pm

Computer Scientist

Post by autoglitch »

I have Computer Science degree, working as an entry level programmer and doing web design on the side.

I have a wide variety of interest and this project hits quiet a few of them.

Sharqua
DustMod
Posts: 245
Joined: Thu May 18, 2006 1:02 am
Location: Bradenton, FL

Post by Sharqua »

I am a gamer, a quality control technician with the Postal Service, a published writer and editor, a VBA programmer, a horse freak, a closet rock chick, a jaw-droppingly fast typist, a feral-cat-now-lap-cat reformist, a got-smart-and-retired-from-AOL forum supervisor, a previously-New Mexico, now-Florida but sick-of-hurricanes wannabe-Tennessee resident, a gluten-intolerant miscellaneous china and candy dish collector and an in-love-with-life universalist.

Oh, I'm also a wannabe amateur astronomer...

...but mostly I collect teddy bears... mostly. :wink:

sb126k
DustMod
Posts: 173
Joined: Wed May 24, 2006 5:47 am
Location: Charlevoix, MI (AKA, Tourist Town, USA)

Post by sb126k »

Student (mini wave in celebration of me!)
You rang?

Eric
Posts: 22
Joined: Fri Jun 16, 2006 3:16 pm
Location: Indiana, USA
Contact:

me

Post by Eric »

Purdue computer engineering student.. and unemployed this summer.

There is a good chance you have been to one or more of my web sites.

mikesobo
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Jun 11, 2006 1:38 pm
Location: Indianapolis, Indiana

Post by mikesobo »

I am an Indycar racecar mechanic. The attention to detail and precision required to make a car safely go 200+ mph and pull 3-4.5Gs every 20 seconds for hours on end is by no means a (low-tech) non-qualifing occupation for a study like this. Just because someone is not in a "related field" or a scientist doesn't mean they should not be part of this project. A persons career path no matter how glorius or ordinary has no factor so long as the work done in the study is accurate. Many ordinary people have a love for science and astronomy just as much as scientists do.

Sharqua
DustMod
Posts: 245
Joined: Thu May 18, 2006 1:02 am
Location: Bradenton, FL

Post by Sharqua »

mikesobo wrote:I am an Indycar racecar mechanic. The attention to detail and precision required to make a car safely go 200+ mph and pull 3-4.5Gs every 20 seconds for hours on end is by no means a (low-tech) non-qualifing occupation for a study like this. Just because someone is not in a "related field" or a scientist doesn't mean they should not be part of this project. A persons career path no matter how glorius or ordinary has no factor so long as the work done in the study is accurate. Many ordinary people have a love for science and astronomy just as much as scientists do.
I totally agree with you, Mike. My interest in astronomy is a layman's interest. My father built a 6' long, 9" mirror reflecting telescope when I was a kid. We lived in Los Lunas, New Mexico at the time -- "out in the boondocks" -- and the results were some really neat views of the moon, Saturn, Mars, and whatever else we could follow by turning the little dials as the Earth rotated beneath us. It gave me a deep appreciation for just how small we are on this tiny ball of rock and water, and instilled in me a love for astronomy that continues to this day.

I work for Quality Control for the U.S. Postal Service, so I too have an eye for tiny details. I really think that the eye for detail can be learned, though. All you really need for this project is a desire to do something nice for somebody else. I'd bet that most folks who join this project, and stick with it, are the types of people who pay the toll for the car behind them in a toll plaza.

Isn't that a cool concept?

-Donna

dangermite
Posts: 6
Joined: Sun Jun 11, 2006 10:51 am
Location: Champaign, IL, USA

"Relavent"

Post by dangermite »

I think its hard to say what "relevant" means for this project. I would think that a mechanic for high performance race cars would have strong obervational and analytical skills. Likewise for software debuggers, troubleshooters, etc. It seems that people from a wide diversity of walks of life could do quite well in this project. That's why I like this project (or at least the concept of it, I suppose technically the project hasn't started yet). It makes actual, meaningful, hands-on science available to the public, and shows that science doesn't need to be done by some elite group of PhD's.

My thoughts anyway.

Sharqua
DustMod
Posts: 245
Joined: Thu May 18, 2006 1:02 am
Location: Bradenton, FL

Re: "Relavent"

Post by Sharqua »

dangermite wrote:I think its hard to say what "relevant" means for this project. I would think that a mechanic for high performance race cars would have strong obervational and analytical skills. Likewise for software debuggers, troubleshooters, etc. It seems that people from a wide diversity of walks of life could do quite well in this project. That's why I like this project (or at least the concept of it, I suppose technically the project hasn't started yet). It makes actual, meaningful, hands-on science available to the public, and shows that science doesn't need to be done by some elite group of PhD's.

My thoughts anyway.
<laugh> Yah, but it helps to have a PhD handling the scanning microscope. :shock: Gotta give props where they're due. 8)

cthiker
Posts: 90
Joined: Fri May 19, 2006 10:35 am
Location: Woodbridge, CT

Post by cthiker »

triphd wrote:I'm an IT-Consultant and Network Administrator. I've been interested in anything to do with space since I got my library card at the tender age of 5 and was really hooked the same year (1975) after watching the Apollo Soyuz docking on TV. So I guess this "qualifies" me to participate in a project like this :wink:
I agree with most of the latter entries - here's a case where people from ALL walks can participate, even if anonymously, to the achievement of an advance in science, however small the measure might be. I, myself, work in healthcare as a Clinical Project Manager, and while I also do clinical research with a neuropsychologist (analysis of disease diagnostics using a neural-networking application), I consider this just as valuable an opportunity to make a personal contribution...not to mention that it gives me a chance to do something significant with my stepdaughter!

However, the diversity of this group is really gratifying - lots of people, lots of backgrounds and experiences. A la the "six degrees of separation" theory, the above quote gave me a chuckle! While triphd was watching the Apollo-Soyuz linkup on TV as a 5 year old, a few days earlier a 20 year old kid personally witnessed, along with his father, the launching of that Apollo spacecraft as it was sitting atop a Saturn I-B rocket. From my vantagepoint on the causeway about 8 miles away, I watched the flash, and then the flame that rose up silently into a somewhat cloud-covered sky, where it disappeared within a few seconds (they flew on cloudy days back then). Only as I turned to my father, who seemed to share my disappointment with the "show", did the full thunder arrive from across the Banana River - shaking the windows in the guard shack next to us as well as the ground beneath! Both he and I went from bored to awe-struck.

Now 30 years later, that still awe-struck "kid" has a chance to participate with others on furthering the exploration of the Universe, regardless of how "small" that Universe seems at times! :wink:

Thanks for the memories, triphd!!

dashadeaux
Posts: 21
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2006 9:19 am
Location: USA, Peoria Arizona

Post by dashadeaux »

THANK YOU CTHIKER!

I've watched many many launches, sad to say none of them in person, and I've been around since the V2's. The only way I can even imagine what it must be like to witness a launch so closely is to remember the sights and sounds of many heavy military four engine prop jobs flying by at low altitude, also a non boring event... How I envy you.

Kindest Regards,
Dash

Nicki Mennekens
Posts: 11
Joined: Fri May 19, 2006 2:33 am
Location: Vilvoorde, Belgium
Contact:

Post by Nicki Mennekens »

I agree with these comments. The reason for my question is not that I wanted to know whether the people here are 'qualified' to do this kind of research, but to see if this subject is also poplular outside of the scientific community. I'm happily surprised to see that this is the case.

cthiker
Posts: 90
Joined: Fri May 19, 2006 10:35 am
Location: Woodbridge, CT

Post by cthiker »

dashadeaux wrote: ...I've been around since the V2's. The only way I can even imagine what it must be like to witness a launch so closely is to remember the sights and sounds of many heavy military four engine prop jobs flying by at low altitude, also a non boring event... How I envy you.
LOL! An honor, Dash! Born in 1954, I was privy only to von Braun's later efforts, not his earlier ones - which was just OK by me! :wink:

However, I would say it compares favorably to the thunder that accompanies a huge lightening strike about a mile away. You know, that long, rolling thunder where the ground and windows vibrate, as do your "kishkas", as my grandfather would say (meaning your "guts"). Only this was a bit more intense.

And if you ever get the opportunity to witness a launch - and they're beginning to "take off" in lots of new places these days since the Ansari X-prize was won - I highly recommend it!

All the best to you and yours.
CTHiker

MDG
Posts: 42
Joined: Sun May 28, 2006 8:01 am
Location: South Africa

Post by MDG »

I've been reading the postings with some interest, and am pleased to see that there is such a variety of "qualified" people. I think I'm the least "qualified". I am a stay at home mom (most certainly not a desperate housewife :lol: ).I make jewellery and wedding dresses, so I'm used to fine detailed work. My passion is our planet and it's place in space, and anything related to space and space travel. I'd love to be the first tourist in space - but alas, that won't happen in my lifetime.

I'm a little sad to see I'm the only South African registered, most people I speak to about the Stardust project think it's not relevant to us here in S.A. which is a pity.

There seems to be a lot of really nice people on this forum and I look forward to getting to know you all a little better. :D

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