Other Space News

This forum is for discussing space science topics related to Stardust@home.

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fjgiie
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B2 Crash

Post by fjgiie » Sat Feb 23, 2008 7:14 am


fjgiie
DustMod
Posts: 1253
Joined: Sat May 20, 2006 8:47 am
Location: Hampton, SC, US

STS-125: Final Shuttle Mission to Hubble Space Telescope

Post by fjgiie » Fri Mar 14, 2008 7:27 pm

Hubble Servicing Mission
  • Image
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubbl ... index.html

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubbl ... index.html

The stories explore topics related to NASA's journey back to the Hubble Space Telescope on Servicing Mission 4, scheduled for August 2008.

fjgiie
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Collisions of spiral galaxies

Post by fjgiie » Sat Apr 26, 2008 3:44 am

New release 24 Apr 2008. Scroll down to the bottom to see all images
http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archiv ... /image/aa/


Some images
http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archiv ... large_web/
Arp 256 The galaxy to the left has two extended ribbon-like tails of gas, dust and stars. The system is a luminous infrared system radiating more than a hundred billion times the luminosity of our Sun.

http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archiv ... large_web/
Arp 148 Arp 148 is the staggering aftermath of an encounter between two galaxies, resulting in a ring-shaped galaxy and a long-tailed companion. The collision between the two parent galaxies produced a shockwave effect that first drew matter into the center and then caused it to propagate outwards in a ring.

http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archiv ... large_web/
NGC 6670 NGC 6670 is a gorgeous pair of overlapping edge-on galaxies resembling a leaping dolphin. Scientists believe that NGC 6670 has already experienced at least one close encounter and is now in the early stages of a second. The nuclei of the two galaxies are approximately 50,000 light-years apart. NGC 6670 glows in the infrared with more than a hundred billion times the luminosity of our Sun and is thought to be entering a starburst phase.

http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archiv ... large_web/
NGC 6050/IC 1179 (Arp 272) is a remarkable collision between two spiral galaxies, NGC 6050 and IC 1179, and is part of the Hercules Galaxy Cluster, located in the constellation of Hercules. The galaxy cluster is part of the Great Wall of clusters and superclusters, the largest known structure in the universe.

http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archiv ... large_web/
NGC 520 is the product of a collision between two disk galaxies that started 300 million years ago. It exemplifies the middle stages of the merging process: the disks of the parent galaxies have merged together, but the nuclei have not yet coalesced

startrak
Posts: 52
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2007 3:53 pm
Location: Kennebunk, ME

WorldWide Telescope

Post by startrak » Tue May 20, 2008 5:21 am

Thought you might be interested in the Microsoft Visual Experience Engine. The "WorldWide Telescope" is free from Microsoft.

Nikita
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Location: Indiana, USA

Post by Nikita » Wed Jul 02, 2008 7:26 am

The Cries from Space caught my ear. There isn't much audio to listen to, but when I closed my eyes and listened, it sounded like vibrant birds more than an "awful scream" as some have described it. I thought I'd share it with you all and see what you think.
From dust we come

fjgiie
DustMod
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Joined: Sat May 20, 2006 8:47 am
Location: Hampton, SC, US

Hanny's Voowerp

Post by fjgiie » Tue Jul 08, 2008 7:13 pm

Hanny's Voorwerp

Ha, ha!
I asked our dustmod Wolter how to translate "Hanny's Object" into Dutch and he told me "Hanny's Voorwerp" so I made a post on Galaxy Zoo about it. Now it is Astronomy Picture of the Day.
Another couple of posts:
http://www.galaxyzooforum.org/index.php ... 6#msg22356
http://www.galaxyzooforum.org/index.php ... 7#msg33337

More about the voorwerp:
http://www.galaxyzooforum.org/tempforum ... 80#msg6380


Decent photo of HANNY'S VOORWERP
Image


fjgiie

jsmaje
Posts: 616
Joined: Tue Aug 15, 2006 8:39 am
Location: Manchester UK

Hanny's Voorwerp

Post by jsmaje » Wed Jul 09, 2008 11:24 am

What an interesting object, and lovely tale about it's naming! I hope both of you, fjgiie and Wolter, will be given credit alongside Hanny when the substantive research papers emerge.

Nikita
DustMod
Posts: 994
Joined: Wed May 17, 2006 8:33 pm
Location: Indiana, USA

Post by Nikita » Wed Jul 09, 2008 2:33 pm

It is wonderful to see volunteer work be rewarded with the coverage! Hats off to the volunteers and to Galaxy Zoo for the hard work. It is a success to all of our projects where we, the non-scientists, make the discoveries!

It just goes to show how all of us, giving a global effort, can contribute so much to science. It only takes one person to make a little difference, and many of us giving a little to make a huge difference!
From dust we come

fjgiie
DustMod
Posts: 1253
Joined: Sat May 20, 2006 8:47 am
Location: Hampton, SC, US

Airbus A380

Post by fjgiie » Sat Aug 02, 2008 5:39 am

Image

fjgiie
DustMod
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Joined: Sat May 20, 2006 8:47 am
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Galápagos Islands Trip by Scott Hurst this August

Post by fjgiie » Mon Sep 01, 2008 12:14 pm

.


Slideshow of a trip to the Galápagos Islands by Scott Hurst
. . . . . .
View Scott’s Slideshow . . . best at full screen , hit F11


Image
. . . . . . . . . . . I believe that is a blue-footed booby

If you want some more pictures see Scott’s flickr site:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/scott_hurs ... 851845141/


fjgiie

DTF
Posts: 33
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Location: USA

Asteroid visit by ESA comet chaser coming soon

Post by DTF » Tue Sep 02, 2008 9:49 pm

On the Discovery Channel news online:

http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2008/09/0 ... 01-ae-0002

startrak
Posts: 52
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2007 3:53 pm
Location: Kennebunk, ME

Supernovae images

Post by startrak » Wed Sep 03, 2008 1:42 pm

Went to http://www.rochesterastronomy.org/snimages/ to read "Latest Supernovae" (to be honest, I wanted to look at the pictures) and the white background images made me think I was searching for stardust. :lol:

fjgiie
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STS-125 to service the Hubble Space Telescope

Post by fjgiie » Thu Sep 18, 2008 5:33 pm


fjgiie
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Hubble Space Telescope Problem Delays STS-125 Launch

Post by fjgiie » Wed Oct 01, 2008 2:50 am

.
. . . . .Hubble space telescope problem delays servicing mission until 2009.

. . . . . http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2008/se ... lecon.html

. . . . . http://www.nasa.gov/news/releases/latest/index.html

Image
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . http://hubblesite.org/the_telescope/

.

jsmaje
Posts: 616
Joined: Tue Aug 15, 2006 8:39 am
Location: Manchester UK

Re: Hubble Space Telescope Problem Delays STS-125 Launch

Post by jsmaje » Wed Oct 01, 2008 1:51 pm

fjgiie wrote:Hubble space telescope problem delays servicing mission until 2009.
How frustrating but perhaps fortuitous, given that this is supposed to be the last ever service mission to ensure Hubble's functionality until at least 2013 when the James Webb Telescope hopefully launches.

The fact that Hubble's pictures have captured the world public's imagination, thereby helping to provide popular pressure on governments in many countries to support space exploration, was one of the themes discussed at the Planetary Society meeting I attended yesterday in Glasgow, Scotland (in conjunction with the 54th International Astronautical Congress). We were being canvassed for our ideas about the way space exploration should go in the next few decades, and how to continue to enthuse people and their governments, despite all their other pressing social and fiscal priorities. I took the opportunity to suggest that one way could be much more involvement of ordinary folk like us in the scientific enterprise itself via the distributed computer model, pioneered by such as SETI@Home (though that doesn't require personal judgment), Galaxy Zoo, and of course Stardust@Home. Several others endorsed this view.

Louis Friedman, who set up the Planetary Society with Carl Sagan in 1980 (and which is now the largest non-governmental space organisation supporting a wide range of projects and is a strong lobbier of the US Congress) agreed, but said it's still not easy to convince many professionals of the value of involving the untutored, horny hands of the general public in their precious science, but well-designed projects such as SD@H are certainly helping to prove their concerns misplaced.

He, and a space advisor to the UN on the panel were taking notes of the audience's suggestions, mostly more sophisticated and far-reaching than mine, so I don't know if my small contribution will have any effect but it would be nice to think it may.

John
Last edited by jsmaje on Wed Oct 01, 2008 3:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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