Cosmic Snowflakes, easily collect together

Archived here are older posts which are no longer relevant or were redundant.

Moderators: Stardust@home Team, DustMods

Post Reply
WeBeGood
Posts: 65
Joined: Thu Aug 03, 2006 7:26 am
Location: Texas, USA

Cosmic Snowflakes, easily collect together

Post by WeBeGood » Sat Aug 12, 2006 5:02 am

Forming Cosmic Snowballs, small comets.

http://smallcomets.physics.uiowa.edu/

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap970530.html

Reading about this subject is what actually what made me wonder if Cosmic Snowflakes existed in the first place. Wondering when I would read about them, what they looked like, what their properties would be, when the evidence of their existence would be discovered. That, and NASA wanting to crash a small satellite into the dark shadow of a crater on the south pole of the Moon looking for water. But, really having no idea what form that water would take in the perpetual darkness of a polar crater on the moon. Just how big can an ice crystal grow in space, could it cover the interior of an entire crater? Or, was it some sort of amorphous snowflake covering it?

On June 8, 1999 in a Usenet posting to sci.space.policy I was contemplating this and their existence, never realizing that the evidence of their existence would soon be published in Optical Analysis of Impact Features in Aerogel From the Orbital Debris Collection Experiment on the Mir Station on August 1999. Now it's August 2006, seven years later and I find myself somewhat amazed and embarrassed that the evidence of their existence has been sitting around on the world wide web for seven years. Unnoticed by all, and dismissed by a few, as an anomalous unexplained result in an experiment conducted on the MIR space station. Dismissed with an unrealistic model where higher and higher velocity impacts create shallower and shallower craters in the ultra-low density aerogel. But, when viewed in the context of a Cosmic Snowflake, the MIR experimental anomaly is overwhelming proof of their existence. Perfectly matching a Cosmic Snowflake impact model rather than the unrealistic ultra-high velocity impact model.

So, I hope you all can forgive me, if my postings seem to be jumping up and down with excitement, as I really am jumping up and down. With the excitement of seven plus years contemplating the existence of Cosmic Snowflakes and finding out that the proof was in the data the entire time.
Courtesy E-Mail Welcome @ WeBeGood@GMail.Com

Post Reply